KIND Sugar stunt
Children sculpted in sugar in Times Square to highlight unhealthy eating habits
August 29, 2017  //  By:   //  Stuff we like  //  No Comment

Anybody who passed through Times Square this morning likely noticed a giant mound of sugar and an array of children sculpted of the sweetener. Kind, the company that makes the all-natural fruit and nut bar, is behind the stunt. To make a statement about the amount of sugar children consume, Kind put 45,485 pounds of it—a 20-foot tall, 30-foot wide pile to be exact—smack dab in the middle of Times Square. 

The move isn’t altruistic: Kind is touting its new fruit snacks, Kind Fruit Bites, which contain just fruit and no added sugar, according to the brand. An in-house creative team came up with the idea for the 45,485 pound mound of sugar to represent how much sugar kids in the U.S. eat every five minutes. 

“Since day one, Kind has been committed to balancing health and taste,” said Daniel Lubetzky, founder and CEO of Kind, in a statement, adding that, Kind “craft[s] snacks with a nutritionally-dense first ingredient.”

According to data from market research company IRI, children in the U.S. consume 80 grams (19 teaspoons) of added sugar per day. The American Heart Association recommends limiting sugar to 25 grams per day. Based on that data, Kind found that “in one year the average 9-year-old is eating his or her body weight in added sugar.” The company, along with Magnetic Collaborative, constructed the sugar children to show what it looks like when children consume their body weight in sugar.

Kind isn’t against sugar,” said Drew Nannis, head of integrated communications for Kind, when asked about the sugar content of Kind’s products. “We believe indulgences are great and should be enjoyed. What we don’t advocate for, are snacks being perceived as healthy, but in fact, are primarily from sugar.”

Nassis added: “Our best-selling snack line, Nuts and Spices, has 4-5 grams of total sugar per bar, which is 50 percent less total sugar per bar compared to the average nutrition bar. We make snacks that are wholesome and delicious, and we’ve maintained a longstanding commitment to using as little sugar as possible without compromising taste. …  We also want to make it easier for parents to make more informed choices which is why we released the added sugar content across our portfolio last year.” 

Via: AdWeek

 

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